lemon balm

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis)

Extracts of the leaves of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) have been investigated as a topical treatment for herpes simplex labialis. Sixty-six patients with a history of recurrent herpes labialis (at least four episodes per year) were randomly assigned to apply, in double-blind fashion, a standardized lemon balm cream (70:1 extract of leaves, containing 1% Lo-701) or placebo cream to the affected area four times daily for five days. On the second day of therapy, the symptom score was significantly lower in the active-treatment group than in the placebo group (4.03 versus 4.94; p=0.042). For the total symptom score over the five-day period, there was a nonsignificant trend in favor of active treatment (13.3 versus 14.9; p=0.16).

Preparations of Lemon Balm

Lemon Balm can be used both internally and externally to fight herpes. The general preparation and use are as follows:

Tea: 1-2 teaspoons to each cup boiling water; infuse 5 minutes; 1 cup freely.

Liquid Extract: BHP (1983). 1:1 in 45 per cent alcohol; dose – 2-4ml.

Tincture: BHP (1983) 1:5 in 45 per cent alcohol; dose 2-6ml. Thrice daily.

Powders: Two 210mg capsules thrice daily. (Arkocaps)

Lemon Balm Bath: 8oz dried (or 12oz fresh) herb to 10 pints (7 liters) boiling water: infuse 15 minutes: add to bathwater.

Other Research: Melissa officinalis Extract Inhibits Herpes Simplex Virus-I Glycoprotein B Interaction with Heparin Sulfate
HP-HSV-MELISSA


Reference(s):
Phytomedicine. 1999 Oct;6(4):225-30. Balm mint extract (Lo-701) for topical treatment of recurring herpes labialis (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10589440)
Bartram’s Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine by Thomas Bartram
Melissa officinalis Extract Inhibits Herpes Simplex Virus-I Glycoprotein B Interaction with Heparin Sulfate by Karen Denzler etal.